27 Jul

MallforAfrica and DHL launch MarketPlaceAfrica.com, a global e-commerce site

DHL-MallforAfrica

MallforAfrica and DHL are giving African merchants a global stage. This week the online retailer and delivery giant launch MarketPlaceAfrica.com: an e-commerce site for select African artisans to sell wares to buyers in any of DHL’s 220 delivery countries. The site will prioritize fashion items — clothing, bags, jewelry, footwear and personal care — and crafts, such as pictures and carvings.

MallforAfrica is vetting sellers for MarketPlace Africa online and through the Africa Made Product Standards association (AMPS), to verify made-in-Africa status and merchandise quality.

“We’re starting off in Nigeria and then we’ll open in KenyaRwanda and the rest of Africa, utilizing DHL’s massive network,” MallforAfrica CEO Chris Folayan told TechCrunch about where the goods will be sourced. “People all around the world can buy from African artisans online, that’s the goal,” said Folayan.

Current listed designer products include handbags from Chinwe Ezenwa and Tash women’s outfits by Tasha Goodwin.

Read more: MallforAfrica and DHL launch MarketPlace Africa global e-commerce site

25 May

Cape Town’s water crisis proves we need to think about water in a new way

Cape Town caught the world’s attention earlier this year with dramatic headlines that it could become the world’s first major city to run out of water, joining an ever-growing line-up of major cities, regions and nations facing comparable threats, including São Paulo, Mexico City, Barcelona, Bangalore, Nairobi, California; and Australia and large parts of the Middle East and North Africa.

A tough water-saving regime helped push back Day Zero for dry taps in Cape Town to 2019. But the crises around the world have surfaced deep patterns of disconnect in our relationships with water. At the same time, at a local scale, water has emerged as a lens through which to view the complex dynamics of politics, governance, privilege and agency in one the world’s most unequal societies.

The Khoikhoi pastoralists, thought to be the original inhabitants of what is now Cape Town, were drawn to the slopes of Table Mountain around 2,000 years ago for the freshwater springs and rivers that flow year round. They named the place Camissa, the “place of sweet waters.” The natural abundance of water also drew early Dutch settlers here in the 17th century to establish a supply station for ships crossing the seas for the Dutch East India Company.

Aqueducts, channels, an old sand filtration system, and other relics of an extensive colonial-era water infrastructure can still be found on the mountain. The growing modern city long ago outstripped these natural resources, however, and these local waters disappeared from everyday life. Rivers and streams were encased in concrete, recharge areas for underground groundwater stores were paved over, and distant catchment areas were tapped to feed the city. At the same time millions of liters of fresh water were channeled from the city out to sea every day in storm-water drains.

But the Cape Town water supply remains as dependent as ever on surface water collected in dams from rivers, and the ecological health of these rivers has long been neglected.

Read more at: Quartz Africa

 

02 May

Nigeria bans cough syrup with codeine after addiction outcry

Nigeria has announced a ban on the production and import of cough syrup containing codeine after a BBC investigation into its role in an addiction epidemic.

A health ministry spokesman told the BBC remaining stocks in shops could be sold with a prescription.

The BBC investigation showed the syrup being sold on the black market to be used by young Nigerians to get high.

It recorded a number of pharmaceutical figures selling the drug illegally.

The joint probe by the BBC’s new investigation unit, Africa Eye, and BBC Pidgin prompted a swift response from people across the country, including Nigeria’s first lady, Aisha Buhari, who said in an Instagram post she was “deeply saddened” by the rise of the problem, especially in the north of Nigeria.

“I call on all security agencies, lawmakers, judiciary, drug manufacturers, civil society, regulators, teachers, parents, neighbours and you to take this as a personal war and halt the menace,” she added.

However, Olajide Oshundun, the Ministry of Health’s assistant director of information, said the ban was a result of months of work by a committee, which submitted a report into the widespread abuse of the medication on Tuesday.

Read the full article here: BBC News

 

08 Sep

New Capital Requirements For Licensed Insurance Companies

The Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) has stated that the ongoing implementation of the capital requirements for all licensed insurance companies operating in Liberia remains on course in line with the CBL regulation issued in 2015 and amended in 2016.

The regulation sets the capital requirement for each class of insurance business, and requires each insurance company to maintain a minimum capital requirement based on the category of insurance activity being undertaken by a company.

Under the regulation, General/Non-Life Insurance Business, must maintain a minimum capital requirement of US$1.5 million Life Insurance Business, a minimum capital requirement of US$750,000.00; and Reinsurance, a minimum capital requirement of US$5,000,000.

The CBL said in a public notice that the implementation of the regulation which began September 30, 2016, is being executed in stages, on a quarterly basis, over a period of three years to allow for flexibility.

The implementation of the capital requirements is part of the reform agenda of the CBL, aimed at strengthening the insurance sector by ensuring safety and soundness of the industry through adequate capitalization, strong corporate governance, adequate risk management and reinsurance arrangements, among others.

The move the Bank noted is in line with its mandate under the New Insurance Act of 2013 as the Regulator and Supervisor of the Insurance Industry of Liberia.

The CBL assured policy holders, creditors and the general public engaged in business with the insurance industry, that the implementation of the revised capital requirement is intended to ensure that insurance companies operating in Liberia are adequately capitalized at all times to meet their claims and other future obligations under their insurance policies as well as unexpired risks as and when they are due.

“The CBL will remain resolute in reforming the Liberian insurance industry in line with its mandates under the New Insurance Act of 2013 and other Insurance laws,” the Bank said in its public notice.

[Via Front Page Africa Online]