21 Sep

Startup snapshot: Moroccan platform aiming to ‘Uberise’ healthcare

DabaDoc is a Morocco-based startup that allows users in the country, as well as Tunisia, Algeria, Nigeria and South Africa, to book appointments with medical professionals – from doctors to dentists. Patients can use DabaDoc for free, however, doctors pay a fee to be featured on the platform.

According to the founders, brother-and-sister team Zineb Drissi Kaitouni and Driss Drissi Kaitouni, their business has already facilitated over three million leads between patients and doctors. The duo briefed How we made it in Africa on how they financed their business and the biggest risks facing the company.

1. How did you finance your start-up?

The company has been bootstrapped.

2. If you were given US$1m to invest in your company now, where would it go?

Despite quadrupling or quintupling in size each year since launch, we still have lots of growth to do. We would continue hiring exceptionally talented people and expanding our footprint into exciting markets.

3. What risks does your business face?

We have established DabaDoc as a leading brand with over 5,000 active doctors and millions of patients. Our risks mainly lie in being able to execute our growth plan in our current markets and future markets we enter. We have substantially de-risked the business as it stands, as we are leading by far in our core markets and our repeat users are great promoters of the platform.

We always keep a very close eye on our market fundamentals to make sure we are proactive and not reactive to any important changes. It’s also very helpful for us to have raised capital from local strategic partners who help accelerate our growth with much more than just capital.

4. So far, what has proven to be the most successful form of marketing?

Our users are our best growth channel. Both doctors and patients love our product, we score very high on NPS.

Read more: Start-up snapshot: Moroccan platform aiming to ‘Uberise’ healthcare

 

02 Feb

UK to boost jobs and trade in Tanzania

Secretary of State for International Development, Priti Patel launches the DFID Economic Development strategy at the African Union Summit in Addis Ababa

The UK will sharpen its focus on economic development in the world’s poorest countries to help create the economic growth that will sustain rapidly growing populations, provide a long term solution to poverty and deal with the root causes of problems that affect Britain and Tanzania, International Development Secretary Priti Patel announced on January 31st, 2017.

Over the next decade a billion more young people will enter the job market, mainly in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Africa’s population is set to double by 2050. This demographic challenge will add to the pressure of protracted crises and mass migration.

DFID’s first Economic Development Strategy sets out how investment in economic development will help developing nations speed up their rate of economic growth , trade more and industrialise faster, and ultimately lift themselves out of poverty.

By helping the world’s poorest countries grow their economies, this investment will help create the UK’s trading partners of the future, boost global prosperity and address some of the root causes of global issues such mass migration and instability that affect the UK.

International Development Secretary Priti Patel said:

“There is no task more urgent than defeating poverty. The UK has a proud record of supporting people in desperate humanitarian crises, but emergency help alone won’t tackle the global changes we face.

With dramatic increases in population across Africa and Asia, developing nations must act fast to create jobs and investment, which is why Global Britain is leading a more open, more modern approach to development through our economic development to help the world’s poorest countries stand on their own two feet.

With the UK’s support, more people across Tanzania have the chance to get a job and build a brighter future for themselves and their families. The UK will continue to build this partnership between our two countries.

Over the next decade a billion more young people will enter the job market. Africa’s population is set to double by 2050 and as many as 18 million extra jobs will be needed. Failure will consign a generation to a future where jobs and opportunity are out of reach; potentially fuelling instability and mass migration with direct consequences for Britain.

Developing countries want to harness trade, growth and investment opportunities and Britain will lead the way to lift huge numbers out of grinding poverty to prosperity.”

The department will work across government to increase the number and quality of jobs in poor countries, enable businesses to grow and prosper, support better infrastructure, technology and a skilled and healthy workforce. […]

You can read the full story here: APO