06 Jun

Zanu-PF supporters to march for President Mnangagwa

Supporters of Zimbabwe’s ruling Zanu-PF party are reportedly expected to march in the capital Harare on Wednesday, in solidarity with President Emmerson Mnangagwa.

According to NewsDay, Harare provincial chairperson, Godwin Gomwe, said that everything was set for the march.

“We are going ahead as planned, nothing has changed in terms of the message for the solidarity march…,” Gomwe was quoted a saying.

This comes a day after the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) Alliance held its hugely-attended peaceful march demanding the implementation of electoral reforms.

The opposition are demanding the publication of the full voter roll, independent audits of ballot papers as well as guarantees of safety for non-government candidates.

Zimbabwe’s next polls – on July 30 – will be the first since the fall of long-time ruler Robert Mugabe who was forced to step down following a brief military takeover in November.

Mugabe who had been in power since Zimbabwe’s independence from British colonial rule in 1980 was replaced by his former deputy, Mnangagwa.

Previous elections in Zimbabwe were marred by violence which peaked in 2008 when then-opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai boycotted a presidential run-off because of a spate of deadly attacks on his supporters.

Mnangagwa has pledged “free, fair and credible elections” as he seeks to end Zimbabwe’s isolation and mend fences with the West.

He will face-off against Nelson Chamisa who became leader of the MDC following Tsvangirai’s death from colon cancer in February.

Source: https://www.news24.com/Africa/Zimbabwe/zanu-pf-supporters-to-march-for-president-mnangagwa-report-20180606

05 Jun

Chamisa writes to Mnangagwa, ahead of election

Zimbabwean leader Emmerson Mnangagwa’s spokesperson, George Charamba, has said that interaction between the president and opposition figures “will only be a fixture of post-election Zimbabwe and not before”.

According to the state-owned Herald newspaper, Charamba said this as he revealed that Chamisa recently wrote to the president asking for an inclusion in a government of national unit similar to that of Kenya.

In March, President Uhuru Kenyatta and former prime minister Raila Odinga said they had launched a new initiative to unify the country that was largely divided between tribes that supported the rival leaders, raising fears of violence.

Said Charamba: “Indeed, he (Chamisa) wrote asking for inclusion in a government of national unity, which is why he has given an example of Kenya — President Uhuru and Mr Odinga.”

Charamba, however, said that Mnangagwa would only likely consider making such an offer after the plebiscite.

He described Chamisa’s proposal as an attempt to “violate the democratic will of Zimbabweans in honour of a bilateral arrangement, more so when that arrangement stems from a fear of elections”.

This came after Mnangagwa reportedly declared that his ruling Zanu-PF party would still be in power after the July elections.

According to New Zimbabwe.com, Mnangagwa also described the opposition parties as “barking puppies” who would not mount any significant challenge to Zanu-PF.

“Zanu-PF is in power. Let it be known that nothing will change in this country even if we go for elections because people will vote for our party. Elections on July 30 belong to Zanu-PF. We dictate what happens in this country. We already have an upper hand and the elections have been won already by us. Let those who want to argue do so, but just vote for Zanu-PF,” Mnangagwa was quoted as saying.

Source: https://www.news24.com/Africa/Zimbabwe/mdc-leader-chamisa-writes-to-mnangagwa-asks-for-inclusion-in-unity-govt-ahead-of-election-aide-20180605

22 Dec

Mnangagwa Reveals 30km Walk Escaping G40 Assassins After Being Fired By Mugabe

PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa has revealed walking more than 30 kilometres crossing the boundary between Zimbabwe and eastern neighbour Mozambique in a dramatic escape from G40 assassins.

He was speaking in South Africa Thursday on his first foreign trip as president, after taking over power in Harare last month.

The then vice president was fired by former president Robert Mugabe from government and Zanu PF at the behest of the veteran leader’s wife Grace and her G40 allies in the ruling party.

He then escaped into exile, saying assassins were on is trail but warning he would be back in two weeks to take over power.

In Pretoria Thursday, Mnangagwa told South African business leaders and Zimbabweans based there that he had been warned his life was in danger in the aftermath of his sacking from government as Mugabe’s deputy on November 6th.

“I came here to pay homage to my brother President Jacob Zuma,” he explained. “I spent a good 16 days as a diasporan here in South Africa after walking some 30 kilometres crossing the border into Mozambique.” He added; “After I had been fired around 4 o’clock (on November 6th), intelligence had made me aware of the next move intended to eliminate me.

“Fortunately, I found a (business) card in my wallet which bore the name of a colleague here, Maphosa whom I phoned and he picked me. I came here and I was well looked after.”

An angry Mugabe fired Mnangagwa from government after his wife had been booed at a youth interface rally in Bulawayo as the bitter Zanu PF succession struggle edged towards an explosive end.

The military then entered the fray, first with a damning statement from former Commander Defence Forces General Constantino Chiwenga on November 13th before tanks moved into Harare and Mugabe was placed under house arrest.

To read the full article, click here. 

23 Nov

Mnangagwa’s Task: Rebuild Zimbabwe’s Economy From the Ground Up

When Emmerson Mnangagwa takes over from Robert Mugabe as Zimbabwe’s president on Friday, he’ll inherit an economic wasteland that will take years and a complete reversal of some of the government’s signature policies to set right.

Among Mnangagwa’s key challenges will be to revive an agricultural industry that collapsed following the Mugabe-sanctioned seizure of mostly white-owned commercial farms starting in 2000, unlock investment in the mining industry by clarifying so-called indigenization laws that force companies to sell or transfer 51 percent stakes to black Zimbabweans and reestablish international credit lines.

“The quicker policy credibility is established, the more foreign capital starts flowing,” said Hasnain Malik, head of equity research at Exotix Capital in Dubai. “Many of the ingredients of a great frontier market are in place in Zimbabwe. While there is much to be done on the government wage bill, recapitalization of the economy and the banking system, the starting point for investor expectations is very low.”

Mnangagwa’s ascension to the presidency follows the 93-year-old Mugabe’s decision to quit Tuesday under threat of impeachment from his own party. While the former intelligence chief has been part of Mugabe’s inner circle ever since he took power when white-minority rule ended in 1980, he and his faction within the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front have signaled that they plan to run the country’s finances differently.

Change is desperately needed. The economy is half the size it was in 2000, and has slipped from being one of the 10 biggest in sub-Saharan Africa to number 20. Formal jobs outside the government are virtually non-existent, there are chronic cash shortages and roads and other public infrastructure have crumbled. Many of the best-educated Zimbabweans have moved to neighboring South Africa and the U.K., leaving the country with limited expertise to rebuild.

Read more: Mnangagwa’s Task: Rebuild Zimbabwe’s Economy From the Ground Up