25 Oct

Retail: Supermarket Surge on the cards for Côte d’Ivoire

Despite Côte d’Ivoire still being dominated by a traditional trade retail base, the Nielsen Shopper World Conference held in the capital Abidjan, has found that the country’s modern trade arena has seen the greatest evolution in the last two years and therefore holds the most potential for growth.

This has been spurred on by the expansion of brands such as Carrefour and Bonprix and a growing consumer appetite for more organised retail outlets, which offer a broader assortment of ranges as well as competitive pricing and enhanced promotional activities. This in comparison to small independent stores that utilise bargaining opportunities, as a form of promotional activity.

Speaking at the event, Nielsen Francophone Africa lead Yannick Nkembe commented: “Traditional trade is still very strong in the minds of shoppers in Côte d’Ivoire, who value the bargaining option they have in open markets and the availability of all the products they want in one place. However, the current development of modern trade and a growing middle class is creating a shift towards more formalised shopping experiences.

“In addition, the activities supermarkets put in to align their offers with those found in open markets, e.g. fresh products and convenience, is boosting the appeal of modern trade outlets. It’s therefore clear that to win, good execution is needed independent of store types.”

A promising economy

Looking at the bigger picture, Côte d’Ivoire’s rapidly developing retail sector is no surprise, considering its ongoing strong performance in Nielsen’s Africa Prospects Indicator (API) where it has retained consecutive top positions ahead of some of its larger peers. The conference also included a presentation on shopper trends in Côte d’Ivoire which found that this is due to its outstanding improvements in terms of ease of doing business. It has also recorded strong GDP growth, several new IPOs, a doubling of the banking sector, low inflation, a stable currency and solid infrastructure.

Read more: Supermarket surge on the cards for Côte d’Ivoire

10 Jul

African consumer products industry rides out uncertainty

According to Deloitte’s inaugural  African Powers of Consumer Products report, despite a much-discussed slowdown in the African economic growth story, the continent’s consumer products industry is demonstrating a resilient and positive growth path when viewed in local reporting currencies.

The analysis by Deloitte shows that the top 50 African listed consumer product companies are concentrated in 15 countries, with South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria and Morocco accounting for 64% of the companies with just above 80% of their total revenues. This concentration reflects the size of their respective economies, their level of development and economic diversification, but also the low degree of capital market development in other African countries.

While the overall African growth story might have ‘stuttered’ recently (mostly due to the commodities decline), the prospects and opportunities for consumer goods companies still reflect a generally positive growth opportunity. For instance, sub-Saharan Africa’s GDP per capita in purchasing power doubled to US$3,831 between 2000 and 2016. While several oil-producing countries have seen faltering investment, East African economies that are less exposed to commodity markets, are growing at rates of 6% per annum or more.

On average, the year-on-year revenues of the top 50 declined by 7.5% in USD and grew by 4.7% in local reporting currencies. When measured over a five-year period from 2011 to 2015, the average of the top 50 compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in USD was 3.5% and 12.5% in local currencies.

“Although African economies have seen their currencies depreciate sharply against the USD, making imported goods more expensive, companies which produce goods locally and are able to ramp up facilities have an opportunity to grow their market share,” said Andre Dennis, Deloitte Africa consumer products leader.

The report considers the performance of Africa’s Top 50 listed consumer product companies in FY15 (year ending up to and including May 2016), as calculated according to revenue in US dollar terms. It focuses on African domiciled companies which are listed on African stock exchanges, with manufacturing as a core business.

Read More: How we made it in Africa